Mock Test #3 – Study for the DVSA Car Test

Driver's Mock Test #3 - Car Test Questions

#1: If your car starts to skid, which is the most common cause?

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Skidding is usually caused by the driver braking, accelerating or steering too harshly or driving too fast for the road conditions. A road that is normally safe can become dangerous when it is slippery. Slow down to a speed at which you can control the car.

Highway code rule: 119.

#2: All of the following are likely to make you lose concentration while driving. Which is also prohibited by law?

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You MUST NOT use a hand-held mobile phone, or similar device, when driving or when supervising a learner driver, except to call 999 or 112 in a genuine emergency when it is unsafe or impractical to stop.

Remember, you MUST exercise proper control of your vehicle at all times. Avoid distractions such as trying to read maps, inserting CD or tuning a radio, and eating and drinking.

Highway code rules: 149, 148.

#3: A large vehicle pulls out in front of you at a junction. What should you do?

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Remember, large vehicles need extra room. Long vehicles may have to use the whole width of the road to make a turn.

Highway code rules: 170, 221.

#4: You are driving at normal speed on a wet road. What should you do if your car starts to skid?

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If skidding occurs, remove the cause by easing off the accelerator.

Stay off the brake. Until the vehicle slows, your brakes could cause you to skid more. Turn the steering wheel in the direction you want the vehicle to go (into the skid). Continue to correct your steering until the vehicle is moving down the road under your control.

Highway code rule: 119.

#5: What is the shape of a warning sign that tells you there is a roundabout ahead?

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There are three basic types of traffic sign: regulatory signs that tell you what to do, warnings signs that warn, and information and direction signs. Each type has a different shape. Triangles are warning signs.

#6: A driver who approaches a pelican crossing when the amber light is flashing must always:

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If the amber light is flashing and there are no pedestrians on the crossing, you may proceed with caution.

Highway code rule: 196.

#7: On the motorway, the hard shoulder could be used:

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You may only stop in an emergency or breakdown.

Do not stop on the hard shoulder to either make or receive mobile phone calls.

Highway code rules: 269, 270.

#8: Your eyesight becomes very poor. Your optician says they cannot help you. In this situation you must:

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If you cannot meet the eyesight requirements you must tell DVLA (or DVA in Northern Ireland).

You must be able to read a vehicle number plate, in good daylight, from a distance of 20 metres (or 20.5 metres where the old style number plate is used). If you need to wear glasses (or contact lenses) to do this, you must wear them at all times.

Highway code rule: 92.

#9: Why should you make sure that your direction indicators have been cancelled after turning?

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Make sure your signals will not confuse others. Cancel them after use.

Highway code rule: 103.

#10: All of the following may use motorways, except:

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Motorways MUST NOT be used by:
  • pedestrians
  • holders of provisional motorcycle or car licences
  • riders of motorcycles under 50 cc
  • cyclists
  • horse riders
  • certain slow-moving vehicles and those carrying oversized loads (except by special permission)
  • agricultural vehicles
  • powered wheelchairs/powered mobility scooters.


Highway code rule: 253.

#11: Which type of light-controlled crossings are designed for horse riders?

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Equestrian crossings (or Pegasus crossings) are for horse riders. They have pavement barriers, wider crossing spaces, horse and rider figures in the light panels and either two sets of controls (one higher), or just one higher control panel.

Highway code rule: 27.

#12: Where is it especially important to look out for motorcyclists?

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Motorcyclists and cyclist are more difficult to see than other vehicles, especially when they are coming up from behind, coming out of junctions, at roundabouts, overtaking you or filtering through traffic. Junctions are the most likely places for car/motorcycle collisions to occur.

Highway code rules: 170, 211.

#13: Which sign gives you advance warning of a double bend ahead?

 
 
 
 
Double bend first to the left. The sign is used where bends of similar severity follow in close proximity.

#14: A person herding sheep signals you to stop. You should:

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If a road is blocked by a herd of animals, stop and switch off your engine until they have left the road.

Highway code rule: 214.

#15: What is the national speed limit on motorways for cars and motorcycles?

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National speed limits for cars and motorcycles are: 30 mph (48 km/h) in built-up areas, 60 mph (96 km/h) on single carriageways, and 70 mph (112 km/h) on dual carriageways and motorways.

Highway code rules: 261, 124, 125.

#16: While driving, this warning light shows your dashboard. What does it mean?

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Make sure that you understand the meaning of all warning displays on the vehicle instrument panel. The side view of a headlight with a series of horizontal lines indicate full beams.

#17: You are driving a vehicle fitted with anti-lock brakes. This feature allows you to:

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Anti-lock brakes are designed to help drivers maintain some steering ability and avoid skidding while braking.

Highway code rule: 120.

#18: Which of the following is one factor that greatly affects your stopping distance?

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Many things affect your stopping distance. Perception and reaction (thinking distance) can be affected by human factors such as tiredness, alcohol, fatigue and concentration levels. The braking distance is affected by speed, tires, brakes, and road conditions.

Highway code rule: 126.

#19: When you are driving on a well-lit motorway at night you should use your headlights:

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Always use headlights when driving on motorways at night.

Highway code rules: 113, 115.

#20: On some roads there are features such as road humps, chicanes and narrowings. They are intended to:

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Traffic calming measures such as road humps, chicanes and narrowings are intended to slow you down.

Highway code rule: 153.

Continue

 

Online Learning for the DVSA Car Test

Continue with this third FREE mock theory test. It has 20 questions and you will see correct answers at the end of the test.

You can take all our mock tests as many times as you need – until you are 100% ready! The test works on your phone, tablet, or computer. You can easily study at home, school, at the library, on the beach, or any place where you have some time to spare.

Each test has random questions from a larger bank of test questions, which means that each test will be slightly different.

Reaching the Perfect Score

If you reach the perfect score of 100% on more than one car test, you are most likely ready for the real thing. But don’t just memorise mock questions and answers. You are more likely to retain facts you truly understand or have studied thoroughly, rather than phrases you have just tried to memorise.

Are These the Real Questions?

DVSA has a bank of more than 1,000 driving car test questions and since they no longer publish the complete set, there is no way of knowing exactly which ones you will get when you take your real test.

Our mock questions are, however, very similar, or even identical, to the actual car theory test.

It is a good idea to always have the Highway Code handy. Read up on mistakes and try to understand why you missed a question. Did you misunderstand the question or answer? Did you read too fast? Or did you simply not know the answer?

Remember, structured learning instead of just memorising is an important key to success.